Resistant Ash?

Resistant Ash?
From The Observer: Robin McKie Observer science editor A £1.2m project to recruit thousands of walkers and other members of the public to help save Britain’s ash trees is to be launched on Monday. The aim of the AshTag project is to use “citizen science” to pinpoint trees that are resistant to ash dieback disease. Cuttings from these resilient trees could then be used to create a new, healthy generation of ash trees that could replace those ravaged by chalara dieback, which reached the UK in 2012 and is devastating many woods. In Denmark, the disease has killed 90% of the ash trees. Scientists hope to minimise the damage by building up details of resistant trees. Gabriel Hemery, chief executive of the Sylva Foundation, one of the promoters of the AshTag project, said: “Last month scientists announced they had identified one ash tree that appeared to be resistant to the fungus that causes dieback. We want to find more trees like this. Then we can create stock to replace affected ash trees.” Read the rest...

Connelly Hospital marks James’s execution in 1916

Connelly Hospital marks James’s execution in 1916
On Friday 13th of May, 100 years and one day after the execution of James Connelly, a Giant Redwood was planted in his memory in the grounds of the hospital in Blanchardstown named in his honour. This is to match a somewhat older and bigger Sequoiadendron giganteum in the centre of the entrance roundabout to the hospital. (Probably circa 140 years old) Thanks to Karl Dalton who is manager of the grounds in the hospital for inviting the Tree Council be part of the...

St Enda’s Pearse brothers commemorative planting

St Enda’s Pearse brothers commemorative planting
Tree Council President Kevin Hutchinson planted a tree in memory of Patrick and Willie Pearse in St Enda’s Park  on the 100th anniversary of their execution. The ceremony was jointly organised with Dr Matthew Jebb, Director of the Botanic Gardens.   ConCurator Brian, Eoin McGloughlin, Ladies and Gentlemen, I feel greatly honoured to represent the Tree Council of Ireland on this very special occasion. 100 years ago brothers Patrick and Willie Pearse made the ultimate sacrifice so that to-day Ireland can take its place among the nations of the earth as a free and independent country. Their sacrifice, and those of the others who died, has given rise to a country, though small in size and population, wields considerable influence in world affairs. This would not have been possible had we not gained our independence. The Tree Council of Ireland is an umbrella body representing more than 50 organisations with an interest in or love of trees and forestry. Given the Pearse brothers’ interest in nature, including having it studied here at St. Endas, it is entirely appropriate to be planting two Irish Oak trees here in their memory. The Tree Council is delighted to be given the opportunity to sponsor these trees and to be associated with the occasion. Kevin Hutchinson Below, Kevin with some descendants of the Pearse...